A churchillian quote on Clemont Atlee

“A modest little person with much to be modest about.”

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The brief differences between modern English Political parties

The brief differences between modern English Political parties

Hello and welcome to my very first blog post!

One of the biggest issues with studying modern Political history seems to be the difference between the English Parties. Therefore I have decided to write my first post on outlining to main differences between the Parties. I am endeavoring to be as unbiased as possible so if you feel that I have given an unfair reflection or missed any vital information please let me know in the comments.

Conservatives (blue)

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The conservatives, sometimes nicknamed the Tory party, as the name imply try to conserve the status quo.  They are mostly funded by rich Lords. They are considered right wing so believe in personal responsibility and lower tax rates and less government control. Traditionally Conservative governments are more likely to cut government spending for example.

Labour (red)

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The Labour Party is considered to be the party that best represent the workers. They are funded mostly by Trade Unions who used to have a huge influence on the party’s policy particularly in the 1970s yet less so today. They are considered to be left wing For example they set up the NHS (National Health Service) and nationalized a lot of industries such as the coal industry. They traditionally believe in higher tax rates but more government responsibility.

Liberal (yellow)

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They are traditionally seen as the centralist party taking some of the ideals from both parties and combining the two. In general elections in post-1945 when the Conservatives lost it was mostly because their voters voted liberal. The last majority liberal government was in 1906 under David Lloyd George who brought in the social reforms such as sick pay. The Liberal party later joined the SDP (a faction of the Labour Party) to form the modern day liberal democrats which could be described a centralist left wing.